November-December 2014 … The Global Online Magazine of Arts, Information & Entertainment … Volume 10, Number 6
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Category — Video

Mary Ross/Video Artist

Eric and Mary Video dance 2011

“Mary Ross – Video Artist”

Interview with Eric Ross

 

The late MARY ROSS was a fine art photographer and visual artist. In 1975, she began using video and computers to produce still images on film, one of the first fine art photographers to do so. Her images provide some of the earliest examples of the convergence of photography, video and computer technology. Recognized as a pioneer of digital photography, her photographs and video art have been featured in hundreds of multimedia performances she has produced in collaboration with composer/performer Eric Ross. She exhibited extensively at galleries and museums in the United States, Europe, Israel and Japan. Her photographs are in private collections and in the permanent collections of the Kunsthaus, Zurich; International Polaroid Collection; Herbert Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University; King’s Library, Copenhagen; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris; and the Lincoln Center Library Dance Collection. Her archive is at the Rose Goldsen archive for New Media Art at Cornell University and at LIMA in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

ERIC ROSS, musician/composer. Ross has presented concerts of his music at Lincoln Center (NYC), Kennedy Center (Washington, D.C.), Disney Redcat Center (LA), Newport Jazz, and Berlin, Montreux and North Sea Jazz Festivals, among many others worldwide. He performs on guitar, keyboards and is a Master of the Theremin, one of the earliest electronic instruments. The New York Times calls his music “a unique blend of classical, jazz, serial and avant-garde.” He began playing the Theremin in 1975, and has performed on radio, film and TV. Since 1976, with his wife Mary Ross, he has presented multimedia performances with video, music and dance. Recent projects include an Ultimedia Concept program at UNESCO World Heritage sites including the Guggenheim-Bilbao Museum, Spain; Residenz Palace, Wurzburg; Bauhaus- Dessau, Germany; and Casada Musica, Portugal. He was a friend of Theremin virtuoso Clara Rockmore, and electronics pioneer Robert Moog. In 1991, he met and played for the inventor of the Theremin, Professor Lev Termen.

 

Q) How did your multimedia Pieces develop?

A) Mary and I started working together in the 1970s. In 1976, we first used live and pre-recorded video in my Songs for Synthesized Soprano (Op. 19). There was immediate synergistic energy to our combined work. Mary wrote, “In 1977, I began to use video in live multimedia performances in collaboration with my husband, composer/performer Eric Ross. At first I used live video cameras in closed circuit installations during performances of his original electronic and acoustic music compositions. Two or three video cameras were mounted on tripods and focused on him as he performed, inside the piano, and I manipulated video camera imagery with a glass prism. The results were displayed on two color TV monitors which faced the audience. Since then, I have produced pre-recorded videotapes and now DVDs which are designed, composed and edited to his music. These tapes, with accompanying video stills and digital images, have been displayed and projected as he performed concerts of his music worldwide. I wanted to create a parallel in the music to the video which would reflect and comment upon the action in different, distant and often remote ways. I like to set up contrasts with the music and images on the screen – fast when slow, bright when dark, dense when sparse – to create unexpected relationships and meanings. Eric’s music has led me deeper into this non-literal, non-narrative form. Musically there are specific themes for some parts and other sections open to improvisation. In performance, the music and the emotional relationship to the video, which is fixed, is ever-changing depending upon time, place and mood.”

By the 1980s, we were performing our pieces in major venues in the US and Europe. We worked with the space and equipment situations available. We performed in big rooms like the Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, the Berlin, Montreux and Pori Jazz Festivals as well as smaller, more intimate rooms like the mirrored ICC in Belgium, the Munch Museum in Oslo and loft spaces in NYC.

Mary’s work evolved steadily. She was a darkroom printer in black-and-white and color film, and in other media including gum bichromate, silkscreen, and Polaroid. She saw video processing as an extension of the technical possibilities of print-making, or an “electronic darkroom.” She included slide dissolves and video during this period. She said, “The video synthesizer functioned as a type of electronic darkroom. My own slides, negatives, prints, movie film and videotapes provided source material.” At a certain point, technique and aesthetic merged and became intuitive.

In interviews we were asked, “Which came first: the music or the video?” Usually, we would work simultaneously and at a certain point of progress, would come together for editing sessions. From that point on, we would stay in close collaboration. Mary preferred to edit to my music – I would give her track to edit to, and then I would orchestrate the final versions for “mixdown.” Other times she would work alone on a piece until it was nearly complete and then I would compose music to it. We were open to different approaches and each piece shaped up differently. Our works were never experimental – Mary and I knew exactly what we were after in each piece and worked hard to get it right. 

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Q) Were there artists she was influenced by?

A) Mary knew the great European and American painters, the classic black-and-white photographers and all kinds of visual references. She was commissioned by universities to photograph art galleries and museums across the USA and EU. Thus, she was familiar with the works of the major artists as well as many other painters, graphic and visual artists, photographers, sculptors, etc. She had a “photographic memory” regarding images. She never forgot a picture and could recall names, places and details of photos or prints she had seen from decades before. Joseph Buemi, a classic black-and-white photographer, gave her occasional help and some darkroom tips and the two remained good friends despite their work being very different. She kept in contact with a network of video and film makers and was aware of work and tech developments in her field. She was an avid reader, writer and prose editor. All of these things formed background to her own work. She never wanted to be copy artist, a clone or from the “scuola de” style artist. She always sought her own identity and vision in art.

Q) What were the themes of her work?

A) The major themes that Mary worked on all her life included: People Real and Abstract; Dance; Self-Portraits; and Imaginary Landscapes. She received a National Endowment for the Arts Grant for her work with dancers. She was very aware of “negative space,” the spaces between things. Most of her images fit into these categories, although she would take a photo of any subject if it pleased her.

Q) Did she storyboard her videos?

A) Almost never. She improvised in the camera, in the studio, and in her editing, mixing and finished work. She knew what she was after, recognized what she actually had, and went with the work where it took her. Because of her great visual memory, she could find and combine edits from materials that were perhaps years or miles apart. She could work on different sections, or from the inside out, to shape the materials. It was a process as well as a product. Mary knew what she wanted in the final print. I don’t think anyone else could have predicted from the source material, or even mid-stream, how the final images would look.

Q) What was her working method?

A) Mary was constantly shooting, editing, evaluating, filing, re-evaluating and re-editing. She shot a lot of film and later digital images, but she was often a one-shot picture-taker. Even her video shots were mostly single-takes. Editing was her forte. She edited herself – always selecting, refining and mixing. Sometimes she liked to let the computer make random mixes, putting together images like musicians “jamming,” and then remix that. Her final edits were always carefully chosen. Mary seldom took the first version of a shot. If she liked something, she would keep working it, sometimes over the course of years, changing things minutely or entirely – adding, subtracting, changing in different media, etc. She liked to work on many projects at the same time and this helped to “cross-pollinate” her ideas.

Q) What were your last collaborations?

A) Mary and I created dozen or so works for video and music. By our last pieces, the Blvd Reconstructie (Op. 54) and Rimn Vornl (Op. 37, 2011 Edition), she had a real sense of the architecture of her time-based art on the micro, middle, and macro levels. She used her own autobiographic materials as a girl, a woman, a wife, a mother, a cancer patient and an artist, with concert footage, travel, dance, human abstractions, family, friends, black-and-white stills, Cibachrome color prints, super 8mm films, gum bichromate prints, silkscreens, Polaroids, watercolors, distressed images, images with text, hand-drawn and hand-colored prints – everything relevant to her life – all in the mix. Ideas that she had worked on during her entire career came together and were interwoven in these last pieces.

Q) How do you see Mary’s artistic development?

A) I think all of the elements of her vision were present early on. She refined her vision by focusing in on the ideas that she loved and that would convey her artistic objectives. She acquired technical mastery over her tools as well, and these tools (home computers, video cameras, etc.) became simpler and more easily accessible over time. In the early years this was not always the case, but she had always “worked with what she had,” or as she might say, “fought with what she had.” Mary had periods of time that were real growth spurts and others that seemed fallow where she did many different things but were in fact “in developmental” stages ready for the next artistic endeavor. She stayed true to her art and her last works were a combination of her ideas with many layers of energy going on, both simplifying and gaining in complexity.

Q) Why do you think her is work important?

A) Mary had an aptitude for getting a great shot or sequence of shots that spoke to the viewer on different levels of interpretation. She said, “The images create a narrative that can be supplied by the viewer’s imagination.” Her mixing of imagery was precise, yet free, strong and beautiful. Her vision was unique from a woman’s point of view without being self-consciously so. Her sense of composition and drama within a shot was enhanced by an expressionist palette, which makes her images even more striking. There is a timeless quality about her work. Some figures in her shots seem to be floating or in suspended animation. Her work was never totally “abstract.” She said, “The human form is a recurring motif…along with many images of dance. Though often abstracted, my photographs and videos usually contain recognizable elements. In recent work, I continue to explore abstract renditions of the human form in imaginary landscapes.”

In some of her pieces, there is a calmness and quiet of infinite spaces, where time seems suspended and there is an air of tranquility. In others, she deliberately introduced chaos, noise, glitches and other random elements to create a sense of real and unreal; there is movement, the action is in flux, and she went for the vital significant energy of the moment. She liked to capture energy, mood, setting, characters, time and place. She was not fascinated by technology for its own sake – she was interested in the human aspects of art and art-making.

 

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c.MMXIV. Tyava Music. BMI. Used with permission.

 

Eric and Mary Ross Ultimedia Concert

$12 general/$10 students & seniors

Advance tickets available at: CornellCinemaTickets.com

Friday, September 12th at 7:00pm

 

A special electronic music performance with composer and master thereminist Eric Ross and his Avant Ensemble, including Trevor Pinch (Moog Synths), Peter Rothbart (EWI), John Snyder (theremin, digeridoo, waterphone), and Joseph Perkins (bass). The evening will feature music on the theremin, as well as Analog and digital synths, guitars, percussion and electronic wind instruments, and will be accompanied visually with work by the late video/computer artist Mary Ross, whose work will be deposited in Cornell’s Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art. The event is cosponsored with the Cornell Council for the Arts, the Rose Goldsen Lecture Series and the History Center of Tompkins County.

 

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August 29, 2014   Comments Off on Mary Ross/Video Artist

Video picks / May-June 2013

videoicon

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SOS

helicopter_grab

About a sort of demented long distance affair gone bad based on two Jeff Crouch poems and tracks, and Steve Johnson cell video.

Cecelia Chapman video

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Francesca Fini, mixed media, 2013

Also in this issue! Ginger Liu’s interview with Fini. 

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Lost in Manhattan

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 Gunther Gheeraert video
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For Video Far & Wide  submissions, please see guidelines at ragazine.cc/submissions/

April 27, 2013   Comments Off on Video picks / May-June 2013

On Location-LA/Ginger Liu

1907-silvia_de_gennaro-joie_de_vivre-press

Silvia de Gennaro, Joie de Vivre*********

Enrico Tomaselli, Francesca Fini

and V. G. Venugopal

speak with Ginger Liu

100×100=900

 

The Project 100×100=900 celebrates the 50th anniversary in 2013 of Video Art. One hundred video artists from around the world are invited to participate; each will produce a video artwork inspired by one of the previous 100 years, with an international exhibit to follow. 

Contributing editor Ginger Liu spoke with Enrico Tomaselli, the project director and some of the artists in the show, including V. G. Venugopal and Francesca Fini.

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Enrico Tomaselli

 

GL) What is the 9 Hundred project?

ET) 100×100=900 Project is a special program launched by ‘Magmart | video under volcano’, international videoart festival, to celebrate the 50th of videoart. The birth of this art is conventionally established on 1963, when artist Nam June Paik realized and exhitibed a video installation in Germany.

GL) How did you choose the 100 videoartists?

ET) The videoartists have been chosen between the selected artists of the previous edition of Magmart. Some of them have been chosen just by their artistic approach, the ‘profoundness’ that can be seen in the artworks… Others have been chosen to include the max diversity of cultures and ‘techniques’.

GL) Could the artist choose their year?

 ET) I matched artists and years randomly. In this way the work will be more ‘intriguing’ and bracing for artists.

GL) How has videoart evolved in the last 50 years?

 ET) There are two fundamental turning points in this evolution and one follows the other. Along its first phase, videoart worked mainly on videotape. It was very close to experimental cinema; the first turning point was the rise of digital videocameras that allowed a wide diffusion of production means and opened new perspectives. New approaches to art by video followed, such as video dance, video poetry and videomapping.

GL) Who are your inspirations, past and present?

ET) My personal ‘guru’ is unquestionably Bill Viola. I see in his video artworks an extraordinary talent to blend video technique and ‘pictorial’ representation.

GL) When and where do you hope to show the work?

ET) We are currently establishing a partnership program, but we have always achieved some agreements that allow to show the project in Italy, Argentina, China, United States, Greece, Russia, Spain, Peru, Colombia, Cyprus and Armenia. We are waiting to complete other agreements for Iran, Brazil, India, United Kingdom and Germany and we are always open to finding new collaborations. The full list is periodically uploaded on the project website. All the shows will be placed between April and December this year.

GL) I’m sure it’s difficult to pick a handful of videoart work that represents the vision of the 9 Hundred project but in the limited space we have and if you had a gun to your head…

ET) The idea base of the project is that to evolve, it is necessary to understand what  past must be once and for all archived. In this sense, to call 100 videoartists to interpret anyone a year of the past century. Besides to constitute a really global narration of 1900s, represent an attempt to process the past, not by coincidence to artists and not by coincidence videoartists. The moving image (cinema, television, web) is one of characterising elements of 1900s.

GL) What is the future of videoart?

ET) Videoart has a great and relevant future and art has been so intimately close to languages of contemporary, at their ‘grammar and syntax’. And the progressive switchover to digital of any expressive form by images, render always more subtle the wall that separate the artistic use of medium by all other uses. In this sense, videoart can reasonably be considered like any art form more inner at XXI century.

GL) How can videoart fans access the work and learn more about the 9 Hundred project?

We are planning a wide range of shows around the world. We’ll publish on our website the calendar of shows and will signal the artists that will go at each screening too. When the public show program ends all the videos will be available on the website. In the next month, we’ll publish a catalogue, purchasable in digital and printed format. Currently it is possible to contribute at 100×100=900 project, at http://www.kapipal.com/9hundred_project;

Enrico Tomaselli, Magmart Festival Art Director
www.magmart.ithttp://www.9hundred.org/

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Francesca Fini

 

GL) What is the 9 Hundred project and how did you become involved?

FF) 9 Hundred is a very original  videoart project involving 100 international video artists. To each one of them has been assigned a year of 19th century that they have to interpret through their art. I’ve been contacted directly by Enrico Tomaselli, art director of the project.

GL) Explain your work and the work you have produced for 9 Hundred?

FF) I’m mainly a performance artist working also on video. I say that because in my videos the presence of the body in action is almost essential. In video performance there is a body that acts in space and time, in a sort of cinematic reworking of a piece of live art, or the image is crushed in formal abstraction and bright explosion of color. The body becomes pure energy, because those spots of bright color still arise from the electronic manipulation of the image of the body in action.

Regarding my work for 9 Hundred… we see a woman immersed in a neutral white. The woman sits in front of a television that transmits statics. But then we see something sticking out from the screen, a red woolen thread. The woman grabs the thread and pulls it; at that point the TV starts transmitting a series of images of the ’60s in America: propaganda films and old commercials, the journey of a man in space and a nuclear testing site. It ‘s like the red thread that she is now beginning to knit is the thread of time, as if in its unraveling it is unraveled the history of that period, in a web of contradictory images. The ’65 is a symbolic year that summarizes all the contradictions of the world recovered from the Second World War: there is a feverish push towards the future accompanied by hysterical terror for the present threatened by the Cold War and inflamed by the spread of the civil rights movement. So while the two superpowers challenge each other on Earth and in space, with the journey of the Soviet astronaut Aleksei Leonov and the achievements of the NASA Gemini project, while the world watches the moon with dreamy look, in the U.S. the first combat troops leave to Vietnam and the infamous Bloody Sunday is consumed, the first march from Selma to Montgomery when 600 civil rights activists were violently attacked by the police. While industrial design, fashion, art and literature are projected to futuristic scenarios, and all around ideas of freedom and equality are spreading, blind ancestral violence seems to dominate every day life. The images in the TV continue to run while the woman continues to knit as if she is some kind of divinity that weaves the plot of Time. For this reason the images end on the words of Malcolm X, which I chose as the emblematic image of a stage so intense and contradictory in human history. In 1965, Malcolm X was killed in a climate of intoxication and violence in which the highest aspirations of the human spirit seem to struggle to break free from the shackles of the lower impulses. The woman assists, inert, while the woolen thread is finished. The time is up. The images wrapped in the red woolen thread became a bandage with which she covers her eyes.

GL) How has videoart evolved in the last 50 years?

FF) Well the main thing is that in the past 50 years we have witnessed a widespread of prosumer and amateur technology. This phenomenon has made available to a larger number of people the basic instruments to express their visions and ideas through video. This possibility once was really a privilege of a few, because of the high costs of film production at any level. In particular, the digital culture has really democratized the world of filmmaking that in recent years has developed exponentially and thus the quality of the works around has reached the highest levels.

GL) Who are your inspirations, past and present (videoartists)?

FF) I madly love Vito Acconci, mainly because he was a performer like me working and experimenting – very very early – with the video and the body in action. I also love Matthew Barney and Bill Viola for their aesthetic and conceptual rigor.

GL) What is the future of videoart?

FF) I think that sky is the limit so to speak. We can see incredible things today: 3d filmic jewels, astonishing generative art, interactive cinema, graphic masterpieces from data visualization… I really cannot predict what will be the future of video art but I can say that the future of art is definitely the video.

francescafini.tumblr.com
www.francescafini.com

Fini’s video FIVE ACTIONS WITH RED GLOVES can be viewed at:

http://old.ragazine.cc/wp-admin/post.php?post=14523&action=edit

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V.G. Venugopal

GL)    What is the 9 Hundred project and how did you become involved?

VGV) 9 Hundred is a Video art project conceptualized by ‘Magmart’ to celebrate ‘50 years of Video Art’ in 2013. It involves 100 artists from various countries who will work on each year of the previous century.

I was part of the VII edition of annual Video Art Festival of Magamart last year and my video titled ‘Elusive Entity’ was one among the 31 award winning videos. It was later exhibited as Magmart selection in ‘Vuotociclo’ Video Art Show at the University Suor Orsola Benincasa of Naples, Italy and the forthcoming 5th FIVAC, International video art festival, Camaguey – Cuba 2013. Since the selection for the ‘9 Hundred’ special edition is based on the previous winners of Magmart, I was shortlisted as one of the artists.

GL)  Could you choose your particular year?

VGV) No, there was no manual selection system. It was done through an online procedure, where each artist is given a ‘username’ and password to enter a particular website link; once we login, it’ll automatically select a random year and display it.

GL)  Explain your work and the work you have produced for 9 Hundred?

VGV) My recent works are attempts of a critical engagement with self imagery. It’s an experimentation using subversive strategies with the language of painting; humor and wit are part of these stances. There is a constant attempt to push the limits of representation and the use of the body with these strategies. The images are caught between complex situations and dilemmas of reality. My figuration portrays an interpretation of everyday reality and nurtures the fragile feelings of human emotions to construct meaningful imagery from the lived reality.

Basically I am an artist trained in Painting and Printmaking mediums. Since last 2-3 years I have started experimenting with the videos. Although I don’t consider myself as a full-time video artist since I am continuing my practice in Painting and Printmaking, I have been fascinated with using elements of drawing and painting in videos. So usually my videos are not completely shot in video modes. They are either a series of drawings or still photographic images converted into videos using ‘stop motion’ animation techniques.

The video I created for 9 hundred project is based on the year 1923 and it is titled as ‘INTUITIVE VOICES’ with a duration of 1:57 min.  Following is a brief synopsis:

In the quest of freedom and democracy during the earlier part of 20th century, India witnessed a transitional phase in the socio-political scenario. When the world was embracing new scientific and technological developments, India was waking up for a new wave of change.  

It was the time when Gandhi was detained and the agitation took many ups and downs; ‘Swaraj Party’ gathered steam by a group of people who sought a more aggressive approach. The voices were many, opinions varied, paths differed; yet the sense of determination and a specific destination kept everyone in a single thread.

GL)  How has videoart evolved in the last 50 years?

VGV) In general the art of the 20th century has witnessed significant change with a number of artists responding to the changing world. I feel video art has become one of the defining part of contemporary art movement in the end of 20th century and early 21st century. Artists are doing a lot of experimentations with a tremendous support of the advanced technology. It has changed the way artists work; there are many artists who use computers today to develop their works and the ‘space’ of an artist is redefined in many ways. When artists started working on ‘video performances’, one of the major transitions happened — because of all these developments, the gap between visual art and performing art has been diminished.

GL)  Who are your inspirations, past and present (videoartists)?

VGV) Since I find inspirations in many things around me and many artists in general, it’s a difficult task to select few names. But if you ask me among video artists, definitely one of my earliest inspirations is Alexander Petrov’s work ‘The Old Man and the Sea,’ which is a stop motion animation using Oil colors. Considering the amount of work gone into the creation and time it’s been produced it’s a remarkable piece of work. William Kentridge is another artist I admire a lot among the contemporary video artists.

GL)  When and where do you hope to show the work?

VGV) Magmart has already joined hands with some institutions to take the show beyond Italy. It’s really wonderful news. I hope it’ll reach a lot many people in different countries. I will also show the video within India whenever the opportunity comes up.

GL) I’m sure it’s difficult to pick a handful of videoart work that represents the vision of the 9hundred project but in the limited space we have and if you had a gun to your head…

VGV) It’s indeed difficult task at the moment; the main reason being I’m still not familiar with the   artists participating and their works. Since the process of uploading and the availability of viewing are not established I have no clue about what’s in store…! But I’m sure, the entire set of 100 videos will be able to create a strong impact in narrating a century with different perspectives and artistic viewpoints considering the political, cultural and geographical circumstances.

GL)  What is the future of videoart?

VGV) I feel with the advancement of time and progress in technology it will take more diverse changes in the years to come. Being an Indian, I think video art is still not so popular among our people. It’s also very new for us although it’s 50 years old globally. There are a handful of artists working on videos but there are hardly any artists doing only videos. For most of the artists here it’s an extended space to work and experiment. There are not much commercial aspects associated compared to Painting and Sculpture. But definitely Video Art as a medium will continue to advance with changing times.

GL) How can video art fans access the work and learn more about the 9hundred project?

VGV) I think almost all the artists must have sent their videos by now since 28th February being the deadline for submission. The details about the project and artists participating with their profiles are already put up in the website http://www.9hundred.org. I hope the online viewing of the video will be established soon. 

For more about V.G. Venugopal, visit:
http://vgvenu.blogspot.com     

 

About the interviewer:

Ginger Liu is a contributing editor to Ragazine.CC. You can read more about her in “About Us.”

 

 

 

 

April 27, 2013   Comments Off on On Location-LA/Ginger Liu

Video Far & Wide

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Ptaszarnia_grab

Ptaszarnia

This short film tells the story of what is happening in your interiors, when everyone had left……

[jwplayer mediaid=”13887″]

“Ptaszarnia” is the first (November 2012) of twelve parts of an original collection called ”XII”, entirely designed by Karina Wiciak (from Wamhouse). The collection “XII” will consist of 12 thematic interior designs, together with furniture and fittings, which in each part will be interconnected, not only in terms of style, but also by name. Each subsequent design will be created within one month, and the entire collection will take one year to create. Here, visualization is to constitute more than a design, which is thrown away after implementation of the interior design, but mainly an image, which has a deeper meaning and can function individually, for instance as a print on a wall, or even a movie. The project “Ptaszarnia” includes the armchair “Ptaszek” and the hanging lamp “Ptaszyna”.
More about “Ptaszarnia”:
behance.net/gallery/XII-collection-part-I-PTASZARNIA/5523845
behance.net/gallery/XII-collection-part-I-PTASZARNIA/6134713
Credits:
Design: Karina Wiciak
Animation and compositing: Mariusz Warsinski
Contact: wamhouse.pl

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spool_grab

Don De Mauro on Spool Mfg.

Video by  Stephen Schweitzer

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violins

Stutter the Violins

…a short film on the struggle of structure and chaos by  Jason Greendyk

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Alexys is reading Little Otik (AfterFx exercise)

…a  video by  

 

 

March 2, 2013   Comments Off on Video Far & Wide

Video: Larry Hamill

New video…
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Liquid Motion-2

At 400 Frames per second, a video of the liquid flow of water and dance.
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Marathon Evolution

Marathon Evolution: Stepping to the Sound of Your Own Drummer, is a slow motion video produced by Larry Hamill (Columbus, Ohio). Hamill juxtaposes runners in the Columbus Marathon, and rain falling into puddles, against the background music of Birch Run, a drumming composition by Kevin MacLeod, to create the percussive experience of the long-distance runner.

Visit at www.larryhamill.com

February 19, 2011   Comments Off on Video: Larry Hamill

NEW! Video: Cecelia Chapman

Take a dip in Cecelia Chapman’s “Water” Video:

Still from Water

Cecelia Chapman calls herself an artist who makes videos. The still is from “Water”, one of a series of 3 on … what else? … Water. The following video, Water 2, is the 2nd in the series. The rest can be seen on her website.

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Another new video by Cecelia with music by Jeff Crouch :

Chasing Rainbows[jwplayer mediaid=”4826″]

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For links to current work online:

http://www.ceceliachapman.com

Cecelia’s Blog – work in progress notes, photographs:

http://ccchapman.tumblr.com/

Editor’s Note:

This is the first video we’ve run in Ragazine, but we’ll have more, soon. We are looking for original short videos (approx. 2 minutes) that have not yet been posted elsewhere, but we’ll sometimes take them if they have. They’ll run in a window on Ragazine, without redirects to other sites, but we will include the videographer’s site references with the piece. E-mail to editor@ragazine.cc, as attachments, with a still from the video. Hope you enjoy. And thanks for reading.

December 31, 2010   Comments Off on NEW! Video: Cecelia Chapman